Cowboy Ethics: Ten Principles To Live By

Click on the photo to reach the blog, "50 Westerns From The 1950s."

Click on the photo to reach the blog, “50 Westerns From The 1950s.”

I was delighted to learn about the Center for Cowboy Ethics and Leadership in Austin, Texas from an article posted by Cowboys & Indians Magazine on the occasion of the Roy Rogers Centennial. What a perfect person to illustrate this blog article on ethics than Roy Rogers, one of the most trusted Americans who ever lived.

When I think of “cowboys ethics,” I recall my youth watching Roy Rogers on television. What a wonderful role model he was for American children of my generation, and for children of my parents’ generation as well.

To quote the article, “He was as good as they come. He was a straight shooter and could sit a horse as if he were born in the saddle. He could yodel like nobody’s business. He walked the straight and narrow in his hand-tooled boots and lived by a code worthy of his white Stetson.”

James P. Owen and the Center for Cowboy Ethics and Leadership focus on the values that are part of our heritage, “values all Americans can share, no matter what our politics, our religion, or our station in life.” Cowboys are heroic — not just because they do a dangerous job, but because they stand for something. Principles like honor, loyalty and courage lie at the heart of the Cowboy Way.

The Center for Cowboy Ethics and Leadership promotes the following ten principles to live by. I believe these are good guidelines not only for businesses, but also for nonprofit organizations.

1. Live each day with courage

2. Take pride in your work

3. Always finish what you start

4. Do what has to be done

5. Be tough, but fair

6. When you make a promise, keep it

7. Ride for the brand

8. Talk less and say more

9. Remember that some things aren’t for sale

10. Know where to draw the line.

The Center not only provides support to adults of all walks of life, it has also developed a program to inspire children to “do the right thing ~ the cowboy way.” Based on the Ten Principles of the Code of the West, the four-week unit helps high school students build the personal qualities they will need to achieve true career and life success.

I recently discovered that legendary film star and humorist Gene Autry (1907-1998), promoted his own “Cowboy Code.”

Autry’s code was written, “for all of his young fans that wanted to be just like him. A wildly popular recording, movie, and television cowboy superstar of the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s, his cowboy code reflected the characters he portrayed: men of high moral character that stood for everything that was good, decent, and fair.”

Returning to the Center for Cowboy Ethics and Leadership, I recently obtained a copy of James Owen’s book, Cowboy Values: Recapturing What America Once Stood For (Connecticut: The Lyons Press, 2008). The book is lavishly illustrated with photographs of cowboys and the American West by a number of contemporary photographers. James remarks that America needs the cowboy more than ever, and he cites Alexis de Tocqueville (1805-1859), “America is great because she is good. If America ceases to be good, America will cease to be great.”

Here is one of many discussions I especially enjoyed:

“With a little creativity and commitment to do something, each of us can find some way to make a difference, however modest …. when we get involved in a personal, hands-on way, it sets up a completely different dynamic: one in which whatever time and energy we give yields a rich dividend in terms of the satisfaction and expanded awareness we get back.”

MORE

~ I follow Cowboy Ethics on Twitter. I also discuss “Cowboy Ethics & Nonprofit Fundraising” on the LinkedIn blogging platform (July 4, 2014).

~ Dawn Moore has written about her late father (who played the Lone Ranger), for The Huffington Post (Huff Post Entertainment), “What Becomes a Legacy Most?” (June 20, 2013). “What’s his legacy? That he inspired and continues to inspire the notion of offering assistance without seeking acknowledgement or fame. To come to the aid of someone in need. Pretty powerful stuff. As is the Lone Ranger Creed. Written by Fran Striker in 1933 as the template for the radio show’s writers – as in, ‘What would the Lone Ranger do?’ – it remains remarkably timeless. Its tenants set quite a high moral bar few people could master; fewer still would even attempt. My dad was quoted often as saying portraying the character made him a better person. A little hokey perhaps, but hey, if the love that flows from his multi-generational fans is any measure of that effort, then I would say he accomplished his goal.”

~ Someone was kind enough to send me a link to an article announcing just how serious the state of Wyoming is about “cowboy ethics.” Here is a write-up courtesy of Huffington Post Denver, “Wyoming ‘Cowboy Ethics’ Codes Become Law” (March 3, 2010).

~ Ralph Pavey of Vaquero Enterprises has posted several codes of conduct you might enjoy perusing, including: Gene Autry’s Cowboy Code, Hopalong Cassidy’s Creed for American Boys and Girls, Wild Bill Hickok’s Deputy Marshal’s Code of Conduct, The Lone Ranger Creed, Roy Rogers Riders Club Rules, Roy Rogers Prayer, Texas Rangers Deputy Ranger Oath, Code of the West, and An Old Cowboy’s Advice.

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